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this apparently was going. earlier on your broadcast this evening, i was chastised a bit in the law enforcement community and were progressing as we moved along, but i wyou have to keep mind, as their looking for these clues, any single one of those clues could lead them immediately to a suspect. a thumbprint on the bomb that they're recreating down in quantico, any tip, any certain surveillance shot or even a photograph that somebody who was at the scene may have taken of their loved ones as they were snapping a picture near the finish line and now notice there is a guy in the background perhaps putting a black bag somewhere. that could be just the one tip that would solve this case. they have extensive manpower on it. there is no way they're getting frustrated this early in the game, but i will tell you, they are in a real urgent hunt to find this person and solve this crime. >> certainly the first 24 or 48 hours, so crucial in that. thanks to drew. let's talk about what authorities can learn from this new evidence. i want to bring in the former fbi assistant director tom fuentes, and don bar
, law enforcement officials are keeping a very close eye on the internet, specifically sites that show people how to make destructive devices. nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers has that part of the story, good morning. >> matt, good morning to you. regardless of who committed this atrocity it's clear these days that anyone with a grievance and the will can learn how to become a terrorist simply by going online. now authorities are trying to use some of these sites to their advantage. the latest evidence bomb makers have taken their teachings to the web this online al qaeda publication posted last month, a guide to carrying out terror attacks including detailed illustrated recipes for pressure cooker bombs, the kind investigators say was used in boston. >> the internet has brought terrorism to the web. it's made it go viral. anybody can look online and find out how to make a bomb. it is a frightening development. >> a similar terrorist manual, how to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom, was posted three years ago. prosecutors say it was used by this former muslim-am
to find the person still there? >> well, absolutely. and that's why you've heard federal law enforcement officials say they're looking at planes coming in and out of boston, even as we speak. as the investigation is ongoing. and one of the things we ought to mention is on all of these component parts, investigators will be looking for latent fingerprints. they'll be looking for dna samples. because somebody had to touch it to put it together. so it's likely that they will have left some mark on this that will be distinctive to them. so all of this will come together to try and help them to quickly identify. what juliette says about it being a boston case is absolutely right. we looked at prior terrorism cases, both successful and unsuccessful cases that have been disrupted, and each time you trace back sort of the perimeter you find that devices are put together in close proximity to where the attack is actually launched. so that's -- investigators understand that and will begin to work from the crime scene outward. >> all right, fran townsend, juliette chi up, our thanks to you. >> let'
in the world will be looking to its intelligence and law enforcement agencies for any clue as to whether or not this has some foreign connection. >> secretary rice president obama in his statement yesterday said how little the government knows, how little he know we don't know who did this why it was planned or executed foreign or domestic. why say that? does the president know that people are listening to every word he said including those who might be responsible? >> of course. the president wants to reassure the american people that the government is on the trail so to speak and that justice will be done. the president has to be careful. he has to be sure that he has got as much information as he can about what is now a forensic effort to understand how this attack unfolded. so i am not surprised that very little has been said yet. this is obviously an act of terror. it was obviously an effort to maim as many individuals, and as many innocent citizens as possible. but the president has to be very careful, not to give out information prematurely here and it's entirel
deserve answers. >> reporter: answers that the full force of u.s. law enforcement and intelligence agencies are racing to learn. was there foreign help or training? older brother tamerlan spent six months overseas last year. he went to chechnya, areas where islamic extremists and violent chechen separatists are known to operate. >> he was away for six months. was that long enough to have done what? >> that's long enough to have done a lot of things. if you're motivated, have the connections, there's plenty of time there to be initiated into a group, receive training and potentially a lot of training. >> reporter: robert mcfadden is a former agent in the n.c.i.s., the naval criminal investigative service. his 30-plus years experience in counterterrorism includes work on the al qaeda bombing of the u.s.s. coal in 2000. >> something just blew up. reporter: mcfadden believes the number one priority of investigators is to be sure there are no accomplices still at large. >> are there other events coming? what other events are planned and doing everything possible to rule out that there c
is doing and the law enforcement and so forth is doing is trying to take care of those people who are hurt and families of wounded and so forth. then we go into the investigate which really starts right from the beginning. and they've got to take their time and really do this the right way. examine everything and go through it like a fine toothed comb as we would say down here in texas. and make sure that they've got all of the details. because a case like this, you're not going to start this case overnight. and i know that we've become accustomed to, let's get it done right now. well, that's not going to make it in a case like this. because there may be overseas involvement here with people who may have been involved in this case. and they've got to go through all of those aspects. and it's best to take the time and get it right even if it takes a few years longer. >> mr. cavanaugh it seems to me because of modern technology and the fact everyone on earth seems to have a cell phone with them, camera with them, recording device, we're getting a jump perhaps. when you see a picture of a bag
of the things we have been talking about in the last day and a half in this investigation is how law enfo e enforcement officials will be looking for a bomb-making signature. some sign that shows where the bomb was put together and where they received their instructions. as you're looking at these pictures, are these the types of things that give you a sense of these signatures? >> quite reminiscent of some major cases i worked on while with ncis. using a device like this, almost always there are components left behind. the crime scene processing and technicians making the initial assessment and even chemical tests are being matched up at the national center, tdac at quantico, virginia. it will be confirmed whether the device flagrated or detonated which would indicate a higher explosive. all of these things produce leads for investigators to run down. >> john and i were talking during the commercial break going back to the olympic park bombings in 1996, the process investigators went through finding the nails that shot out of the bomb, tracing the nails back to the manufacturer and finding
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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